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Shanghai in the Spotlight: GW students experience the Expo

This guide is a part of the Global Resources Center's exhibit on Shanghai and World Expo 2010. It aims to provide both print and electronic resources on Shanghai, covering Shanghai's history, economy, social life, culture and architecture.

GW Experiences

GW students with Haibao, the Expo mascot.

GW students with Haibao, the Expo mascot. Picture by Urvaksh.

GW students in the Expo.

GW students in the Expo. Picture taken by Urvaksh.

GW student in front of the China Pavilion.

GW student in front of the China Pavilion.Picture by Jiayi Wang.

The interior of China Pavilion.

The interior of China Pavilion. Picture taken by Yang Jiang.

China pavilion at night time.

China pavilion at night time, still a lot of people waiting to get in. Picture was taken by Qianlan Zeng.

Artwork depicting a flowing river during the Qingming festival in China.

The amazing flowing along the river during the Qingming festival in China Pavillion. Picture taken by Yang Jiang.

Expo ferry to cross the Huangpu river.

Expo ferry to cross the Huangpu river. Picture taken by Urvaksh.Multiple national flags flying at Expo 2010.

Flags at the Expo. Picture taken by Urvaksh.Sculpture in front of the science and technology pavilion.

Sculpture in front of the science and technology pavilion. Picture taken by Jun Li.

Interior view of Expo Axis building.

Expo Axis. Picture taken by Yang Jiang.

Performing Arts Center of Shanghai.

Performing Arts Center of Shanghai. Picture taken by Yang Jiang.

 

World Expo Museum building.

World Expo Museum. Picture taken by Jun Li.

Telecommunications pavilion.

Telecommunication pavilion. Picture taken by Jun Li.

People waiting at the entrance of China Pavilion.

People waiting at the entrance of China Pavilion. Picture taken by Wei Qian.

Interior of the Polish Pavilion.

Interior of the Polish Pavilion. Picture taken by Yang Jiang.

Wood carvers at work on a large sculpture.

Wood carving in a steamy day. Picture taken by Yibing Dong.

The Energy Source sphere in the German Pavilion.

Source of Energy. Picture taken by Wei Qian.

Night view inside Expo.

Night time at Expo. Picture taken by Yibing Dong.

Sculpture in the Danish Pavilion.

Sculpture in the Danish Pavilion. Picture taken by Yibing Dong.

Giant baby robotic sculpture at Spanish Pavilion.

Huge huge baby at the Spain Pavilion. Picture taken by Tianyou Li.

Exterior view of Expo grounds at night.

Expo at night. Picture taken by Tianyou Li.

Sign indicating wait time for entrance line: "Four hours from this point."

Sign for waiting time. Picture taken by Urvaksh.

Dance troupe performance at the Expo.

Performance in the Expo. Picture taken by Jiayi Wang.

Cylindrical screen at the South Korea Corporate pavilion

Cylinder screen at the South Korea Corporate pavilion. Picture taken by Tianyou Li.

GW Perspectives : Pavilions from different countries

During the summer, some GW students went to Shanghai and attended the Expo 2010. They were kind enough to share their photos with us. They are: Wei Qian, Yang Jiang, Urvaksh, Qianlan Zeng, Jun Li, Jiayi Wang, Yibing Dong and Tianyou Li.

The main structure of the China Pavilion at the Expo 2010

The main structure of the China Pavilion. It is called "the Crown of the East", which has a distinctive roof, made of traditional dougong or brackets. This style dates back more than 2,000 years. Picture by Yibin Dong.

The Korean Pavilion at the Expo 2010

The Korean Pavilion is an amalgamation of "sign" (symbol) and "space". Signs become spaces, and simultaneously, spaces become signs. Picture taken by Yang Jiang.

The Spanish Pavilion at the Expo 2010.

The Spanish Pavilion has a wicker facade over a steel structure. It aims to express the meaning of a bridge between East and West, and among Spain and China. Picture taken by Yang Jiang.

The Polish Pavilion at the Expo 2010.

The Polish Pavilion is inspired by traditional Polish folk art paper cut-outs, but reinterpreted in a contemporary fashion. The building focuses on exploring the importance of the personal experience between buildings and people. Visitors can climb onto the roof of the building by using the ramp created by the folded exterior. Picture taken by Yibin Dong.

The Netherlands Pavilion at the Expo 2010.

The Netherlands Pavilion is known as "Happy Street." It is constructed in a figure eight, a lucky number in Chinese culture. Built completely on stilts, the street looks like a suspended roller coaster. Picture taken by Urvaksh.

The Turkish Pavilion at Expo 2010.

The Turkish Pavilion, Cradle of Civilization. The pavilion looks like an amazing red and beige box with an animal sculpture, inviting visitors to explore a maze of dreams. Picture taken by Yibin Dong.

The German Pavilion at Expo 2010.

The German Pavilion aims to create a "harbor image" and a "dynamic tunnel" with urban scenes from Germany. This is the "Balancity," a magnificent crystallization of Germanic originality and technology. Picture taken by Urvaksh.

The Romanian Pavilion at Expo 2010.

The Romanian Pavilion derives from the color and environmental implications of green. The shape comes from Romania's most popular fruits, the apple. Together it represents a "green city," "healthy life" and the concept of sustainable development. Picture taken by Urvaksh.

The Saudi Arabian Pavilion at Expo 2010.

The Saudi Arabian Pavilion features a huge hanging boat shaped like a half moon. The "moon boat" is loaded with dreams and friendship. Picture taken by Urvaksh.

 

The USA Pavilion at Expo 2010.

The USA Pavilion "is a mammoth gray steel structure meant to resemble an eagle stretching its wings in welcome. The pavilion presents a dynamic and emotional story that conveys four core concepts: sustainability, teamwork, health and the spirit of striving for success." Picture taken by Urvaksh.

The Swiss Pavilion at Expo 2010.

The Swiss Pavilion is combination of technological insight and beautiful dream. It shows "the characteristics of modern Switzerland, including the pursuit of excellence, innovation and high-quality life, as well as concepts of future facing, forward looking and sustainable development." Picture taken by Urvaksh.

The Italian Pavilion at Expo 2010.

The Italian Pavilion comes from the children's game "pick-up-sticks," which is known as "Shanghai" in Italy. Picture taken by Wei Qian.

The Russian Pavilion at Expo 2010.

The Russian Pavilion "reflects the ideas of transformation of urban communities, the potential Russian cities have, and their relationships with neighboring territories." Picture taken by Yibin Dong.

Reference: Official website of Expo 2010 Shanghai China at http://en.expo2010.cn/

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